Statement On Mau forest Compensation

On behalf of the Deputy Prime Minister I would like to state as follows:-
Dennis Onyango’s statement on the Mau compensation raises certain issues that need to be addressed as follows:-

1. The Deputy Prime Minister Hon. Uhuru Kenyatta has only publicly discussed the issue of the Mau on two key occasions:-(a) At a fundraising to raise money to settle those displaced by the evictions from the Mau, where he attended in his personal capacity. What he said at the fundraising was that there was no need to add more tents when we are trying to remove others. The purport of his statement was that there was no need to have more displaced persons living in tents as we already were trying to deal with the settlement of the current IDPs. The statement is a matter of public record.(b) When he was responding to a media story that gave the impression that the government intended to pay out large sums of money as compensation to large landholders. He was categorical that no arrangement had been made nor any discussion entered into for any payment by the government. The government has not made any budgetary allocation for the payment of any compensation for landowners of any kind. He made the statement as the public were concerned and he was reassuring them that no arrangement as alleged had been entered into, and that is the position.

2. The Deputy Prime Minister Hon. Uhuru Kenyatta has never attacked any policy of the government on Mau at any time

3. The matter of resettlement of Mau evictees has been discussed by government, on humanitarian grounds, but there has been no discussion on compensation on large landholders, there is no contradiction in this regard.

4. The Deputy Prime Minister Hon. Uhuru Kenyatta has never at any time tried to play politics with the issue of Mau, and the allegation is not only baseless and unsustainable, but is in itself playing politics with Mau.

5. The ministry of Finance has not entered into consultations nor discussions with large land owners nor has he received any communication from any government department for any valuation or intent to pay large land owners. Further we have not factored any such payments into the current budget

In conclusion the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister for Finance would wish to inform Kenyans that it is committed to maintaining macro-economic stability and implementation of sound financial management principles and policies. In this regard, the Ministry has and will remain focused on committed government programmes of which compensation of large land owners is not one of themThe Prime Minister is a principal in the coalition government and if Dennis Onyango has any reason to doubt a government statement issued in consultation with other government departments, he should not have responded through the media but should have done so through laid down government procedures.

Njee Muturi
Principal Liason Officer
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister for Finance
22nd December, 2009

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6 thoughts on “Statement On Mau forest Compensation

  1. Pingback: Official Statement On Mau Compensation-Office of DPM Uhuru Kenyatta - Mashada Forums

  2. This is a mere P.R job.Why make a statement just to defend your boss mr.Njee this guy said no one is getting paid.Did he skip a cabinet meeting? Is he sure this people who made him read Moi are not getting paid?He need listen to the hansard and at least be updated.He has made political statement that are alarming pertaining Mau give us break sir.

  3. matheri :This is a mere P.R job.Why make a statement just to defend your boss mr.Njee this guy said no one is getting paid.Did he skip a cabinet meeting? Is he sure this people who made him read Moi are not getting paid?He need listen to the hansard and at least be updated.He has made political statement that are alarming pertaining Mau give us break sir.

  4. I actually see no contradictions here. Uhuru has simply stated that his ministry has made no arrangements (yet) of making any payouts–see points 3 and 5. I dont understand what the brouhaha is. My only concern is how the PM and his Deputy choose to coordinate their portfolios through the media. Is there no protocol governing decision making and communication in government?

    On compensation, the law demands it. What Kenyans *should* be doing is providing the evidence necessary to nullify the titles, especially the first titles acquired from the degazettment of the forest, regardless of the complexities. The titles held by the peasants (all close to 2000 of them per Michuki) were allegedly acquired in good faith and must be respected. But that leaves the matter of non-title holders who have customary rights unresolved–they too deserve compensation.

    It behoves Kenyans to start doing things *right*. There is little sense in ignoring the law just because a majority says so–shall people be governed by the whims and feelings of a revenge-seeking/blood thirsty majority? I would wish not.

    Public opinion can inform the legal and technocratic process. I see no real reason why the Mau issue should continue to be driven by ODM politics. Here is a great opportunity to learn and to set governance processes straight.

    Couldn’t have said it better .Most of the problems in Kenya are systemic and not mainly personality driven as the media and small minded Kenyans would have us think.I always tell people listen to what is being said and no who is saying it.Uhuru’s position is clear .Anyone who understanding English and can join sentences logically can understand his position.Those attacking his position are just lost.Another case of Uhuru cant be right because I support Raila. Kenyans need to move beyond personalities-Admin

  5. And now, we begin to understand how Kenya government has hastily and trashily handled the Mau—opportunities for generating revenues through carbon trading. Shame. There is increasingly an international move to chart out best practices and codes of conduct to govern the carbon trade–I really hope that potential buyers will take that seriously. If they do, Kenya government will have to rethink it’s hasty and inhumane evictions of forest-dwelling and forest adjacent communities, notably the poorer types.

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